3D Thursday: Brew-tea and the Box’d

Sorry, Mr Disney…..

Once upon a time, whilst foraging for craft supplies, PaperPuff came across a small cardboard curiosity. “WTH (polite version) is this?” She thought. On further tentative inspection it appeared to be a kind of favour, or gift wrap for those cute little individually packaged tea bags. The mists of wine time cleared and PaperPuff remembered the box, and how it came to be. She had seen it many moons past on Craft telly and made one quick, before she forgot about it. Then she forgot about it. Silly PaperPuff!!

tea-bag-holder-pair

Don’t you just love it when a plan falls apart?!

I honestly don’t know if these are faithful replicas made from measurements supplied, or whether I employed good old Brain to work it out. However, to be honest, some basic measuring is all we need to do. I hope I am not doing anyone an injustice.

So, I thought it might make a nice 3D Thursday project and set about re-measuring and making another. There are I believe many versions of this kind of holder out there: this one is super-simple and requires a minimal amount of tools.

If you want to have a go, here is what to do:

I used Twinings individually wrapped tea bags which measure 6.5cm wide x 7.5cm high. If yours are different you will of course need to take this into account.

1. Grab a piece of decent weight double-sided card and cut it to 8 x 25cm

2. Score this at 9, 11, 20 and 21.5cm, fold and burnish the creases. If you want you can round the corners of the top flap (the 3.5cm panel). I couldn’t find my corner rounder (I know, find one thing, lose another!!) so went for a WRMK scallop Chomp instead. I expect this too will have disappeared next time I need it.

Tip: if your card has a one-way pattern, remember that as you are basically making a wrap, at some point the pattern will be upside down. Obviously the back is the best place for this (and you can always cover it over with another panel if this bothers you)! If you make your first score at 9cm from the top of the pattern (think of it as a roll of wallpaper) this should work out fine and your top and lower flaps at the front should both be the correct way up. If your one-way pattern repeat is going to be on the inside you will need to flip this, so your first score (9cm) will be at the bottom of your piece. Or, make life easy and just choose a non-repeat patterned paper!

3. Next cut 2 pieces of card 11 x 8cm. These are going to form the pleated side sections. You can go crazy and choose another pattern here for extra interest. I did on the first holder I made (the spotty one) but figured I had enough going on already on the second one with the birds.

Score these pieces at 1.5cm, then again at 1cm intervals until you get to 9.5cm, leaving a last section of 1.5cm again.

4. Concertina fold these score lines. Add strong double-sided tape (or glue if you prefer) to the outside of the 1.5cm tabs and fix them inside the ‘wrap’. I found it easier to stick each of to the back first, then the front, and you want the raw edge (not a fold) of the 1.5cm sections to be on the inside. If you butt the pleated sections up to the score lines and the base, and just keep the sides square with your hand, it happens really easily. If this is at all confusing, look at the images below for the positioning. Much better than me trying to explain!! The slideshow I planned would have been even better, but it is refusing to work for some reason I cannot fathom.

5. To make your dividers, just cut more patterned card into 7.5 x 8cm rectangles – you will need 3 for this configuration. Slide them into your pleated sections and ba-boom, instant little pockets!

The fastening can be whatever you want. I had used baker’s twine on the first one and ribbon this time. Cut enough to wrap around and tie in a bow – I snipped a length a little under 60cm to give enough to play with and trimmed the excess. I used a die cut for one closure and fussy cut an image for the other, and punched a small hole at the bottom. The ribbon or twine was glued centrally on the top flap, close to the edge, and then fed through the hole and tied.

 

What did I learn second time around? Well, because my one-way pattern repeat was quite large I wasn’t happy with how it looked where the top and bottom sections met at the front, so I just cut a panel the same size from a closer pattern repeat and covered the offending top tab completely. Really, smaller, or massively larger patterns would probably be better options. The spots I chose initially were a good way to go if you want to keep it simple.

You don’t need double-sided card, it just makes it more interesting if the inside is also colourful. I want to make a stamped version too, with a teacup as the fastener, which I think will be kind of cute. Time is always an issue though!

These little pouches could be for gifts, showers, favours, or a small thank you, perhaps. You could leave out the concertina folds in the sides and just make a small unpleated section to create a simple single pocket. But something about pleated paper makes me happy…..

Supplies: both holders are made from Tilda Winterbird paper pad

Scrapbustin’ gone awry

Like so many paper crafters, I find it difficult to bin stuff. When I make a card, it is only the smallest bits of waste that get tossed – you know, the bits that look like martians/amoeba/misformed vegetables/tattoos. Even though scraps go into recycling to help save the universe (!) I still want to keep anything pretty above a few centimetres in size, just in case it comes in handy for something else. And if it is from a more expensive range, well the law of inverse proportion comes into play. The more it cost, the smaller the scrap I will keep. I am almost willing to bet the farm (ok, I don’t actually own a farm. South London is not big on agriculture) that I am not alone here.

So, I have resolved to make more of an effort to use up scraps and then part company with the remnants that really are just taking up valuable space and serving no useful purpose.

Tough love! Buy it, use it, recyc-l-it! Ok, so that catchphrase needs some work. On the creative spelling if nothing else.

Dive right in to the general scrap box then? No, actually. There are two ranges of paper/card with which I am uber-fussy (sorry, can’t find an umlaut for my uber): Graphic 45 and Craftwork Cards. For these guys, whenever possible I am super-organised and store them by range/pad in pockets or folders and then I can include any tiny leftovers and keep them nice and safe. Because I have been using Craftwork Cards recently, I know there are lots of slivers and slices waiting for me in the Heritage Rose pouch. Convenience wins.

I need to apologise because this layout is definitely based on a card sketch I saw on Pinterest, and I was going to attempt to link to it but I cannot find the pin. I 100% believe in giving credit to the originator, so I am very sorry not to be able to do this. If anyone know the pin/site do let me know and I will try to include it.

Anyway, here is the card I made from scraps. And one tiny sentiment.

CWC heritage rose scraps card

Then, because I found it rather pleasing in design (sorry, I appear to have been briefly possessed by someone from the 19th century) I decided to use the same-ish layout again for another card. Using a stack from which I can find no scraps. Meaning many sheets of 12”x 12” paper have been rent asunder (19th century woman paying another visit). More scraps have been created. Nobody judge me, OK?! I’m just going to have to save the universe another day. In the meantime I need to make up another bag of bits…

Tilda Winterbird card

Supplies: Craftwork Cards Heritage Rose papers; Tilda Winterbird paper pad; Xcut tiny heart die and a small hole punch

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heart-shaped box

I have just tried out my new heart box dies. This is the first one, warts and all:

kraft heart box

I used some very sturdy patterned Kanban kraft card I have had for years. It’s not a terrible effort, but you can see it is untidy at the top. Also around the ‘shoulders’ of the heart it is not a seamless join. So I tried again.

Attempt number two is now introducing itself to the contents of the bin. It has plenty of other craft disasters there to keep it company. I tried making it from really thin card, thinking it would be easier to bend into shape, but actually it just magnified every flaw. I can’t show you a photo because I screwed it up in frustration!

So, how about a medium weight cardstock? Ladies and gentlemen, I give you attempt number three:

This time before adhering the side panels I went over the fold lines on the base and lid with a ball embossing tool, hoping that this would help the heart shaping of the shoulders to happen, and paid more attention to getting the join at the top neatly finished. Better, but not perfect. Still, I liked it enough to stick a ribbon on it.

So, am I happy with my purchase? Yes, I think so, but I need to play with these dies some more to get the best out of them. I can think of worse things to have to do!!